Reasons to Give Thought To Putting in a Disappearing Water Fountain in your Backyard

a-204__66701.jpg The other term for a disappearing fountain is a “pondless” fountain. You are not able to see where the water comes from, because it is underground. Disappearing fountains add calming sound effects and striking visuals to any place where people gather. They are available in a range of unique styles including waterfalls, columns made of granite, ceramic pots, and millstones.

There are many special benefits to a disappearing fountain contrary to other fountains. The water comes from underground and does not form a large pool above ground so any risk to those around it is reduced. That said, you will not have to worry about the security of your children. Additionally, due to the fact that water is stored below ground level, none of it is lost to evaporation. This means you will lose less water than if you had another type of fountain. This type of fountain is recommended if you do not have a lot of time to clean it often since neither dirt nor algae can contaminate it underground.

Finally, due to its reduced size, it is simpler to install it where you want it than other types of fountains.

Water Elements: Fundamental in any Japanese Gardens

You will rarely see a Japanese garden that does not include a water element. They tend to be put right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are regarded as being representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. It is unusual to see extravagantly-designed Japanese fountains since the emphasis is supposed to be on the water itself.

Many people also get a water fountain that features a bamboo spout. The bamboo spout is placed over the basin, typically made of natural rocks, and water trickles out. It must have a worn-down, weathered appearance as well. So that the fountain looks at one with nature, people customarily enhance it with natural stones, pretty flowers, and plants. To the owner of the fountain, it obviously is more than just attractive decor.

An alternative is to get a stone fountain, set it on a bed of rock, and place live bamboo and pretty stones around it. Gradually moss begins to grow over the stones and cover them, and as that happens the area begins to look more and more like a natural part of the landscape.

If you are blessed enough to have a big plot of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate. Popular water feature additions are a koi pond or any sort of tiny pool, or even a meandering brook.

Japanese fountains, on the other hand, do not actually need to have water in them. Lots of people decide to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in actual water. The impression of a creek with running water can also be achieved by putting flat stones very closely together.

The Famous Revelation Garden Fountain at Chatsworth

Angela Conner, the widely known British sculptor, crafted “Revelation,” the latest addition to the appealing exterior fountains of Chatsworth. In commemoration of the Queen’s 80th birthday, she was commissioned by the late 11th Duke of Devonshire to build a limited edition bust of Queen Elizabeth designed of brass and steel in 2004. Jack Pond, one of Chatsworth’s oldest ponds, had “Revelation” placed in 1999. Taking on the form of four big flower petals which open and close with the circulation of water, the metal fountain alternately hides and displays a gold colored globe at the center of the sculpture.

A metallic globe decorated with gold dust was integrated into the sculpture, which rests five meters high and five meters in width. This latest water fountain is a fascinating addition to the Gardens at Chatsworth because the petals’ movement is totally run by water.

Introduce the Energy of Feng Shui into Your Yard

Integrating feng shui design into your yard will help circulate its energy into your home and your life.

Size is not the main factor when adding feng shui design to your garden. If you have a lavish, eye-catching one, that is great, but even a smaller area works well with feng shui design.

The main feng shui tools can be utilized for your interior decor as well as your garden design. The first step is to understand the bagua, or energy map, of your home, as your garden’s bagua will be an extension of that.

It is also important to know the five elements in the theory of feng shui and how best to use each one to maximize its energy.

Feng shui design calls for the Earth element, for example, to be incorporated into the northeastern corner of your garden, as that section connects to self-cultivation and personal development energy. The ideal addition to the northeast corner of your yard might be a peaceful Zen garden decorated with natural stone, as they represent the Earth element in feng shui.

Think about incorporating a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and abundance).

From Where Did Large Garden Fountains Originate from?

The incredible construction of a fountain allows it to provide clean water or shoot water high into air for dramatic effect and it can also serve as an excellent design feature to complement your home.

From the onset, outdoor fountains were simply meant to serve as functional elements.

Inhabitants of urban areas, townships and small towns utilized them as a source of drinking water and a place to wash, which meant that fountains had to be connected to nearby aqueduct or spring. Used until the 19th century, in order for fountains to flow or shoot up into the air, their source of water such as reservoirs or aqueducts, had to be higher than the water fountain in order to benefit from the power of gravity. Fountains were an optimal source of water, and also served to decorate living areas and celebrate the artist. Bronze or stone masks of wildlife and heroes were frequently seen on Roman fountains. Muslims and Moorish landscaping designers of the Middle Ages included fountains to re-create smaller versions of the gardens of paradise. The fountains seen in the Gardens of Versailles were intended to show the power over nature held by King Louis XIV of France. The Romans of the 17th and 18th centuries created baroque decorative fountains to glorify the Popes who commissioned them as well as to mark the location where the restored Roman aqueducts entered the city.

Indoor plumbing became the key source of water by the end of the 19th century thereby limiting urban fountains to mere decorative elements. Fountains using mechanical pumps instead of gravity enabled fountains to bring recycled water into living spaces as well as create unique water effects.

Modern fountains are used to embellish public spaces, honor individuals or events, and enhance recreational and entertainment events.

A Short History of Fountains

Towns and communities depended on working water fountains to channel water for preparing food, washing, and cleaning up from nearby sources like ponds, streams, or springs. A source of water higher in elevation than the fountain was needed to pressurize the flow and send water squirting from the fountain's spout, a system without equal until the later half of the nineteenth century. Typically used as monuments and commemorative structures, water fountains have inspired men and women from all over the world all through the ages. The common fountains of today bear little likeness to the very first water fountains. Simple stone basins sculpted from local stone were the first fountains, used for religious functions and drinking water. The oldest stone basins are believed to be from about 2000 BC. The force of gravity was the energy source that operated the earliest water fountains.

Located near reservoirs or creeks, the practical public water fountains provided the local residents with fresh drinking water. Fountains with decorative Gods, mythological beasts, and creatures began to appear in Rome in about 6 B.C., made from natural stone and bronze. The impressive aqueducts of Rome furnished water to the incredible public fountains, many of which you can travel to today.

A Water Element Your Cat Will Appreciate

Whenever your cat hears water running in the kitchen, does he come running? Does he reach into the toilet or feel the water in his bowl before sticking his face in it? Cats do not like to consume water that is not moving, and this act shows this. As a matter of fact, they do not have a strong natural inclination to hydrate.

Out in nature, cats consume meat full of moisture which keeps them adequately hydrated. For this reason, an intuitive need for water never evolved in felines. Owner's of a pet cat, on the other hand, need to make sure their cats get adequate water because it is an important part of their overall health. To maintain a healthy water supply for your pet, get it a cat fountain.

If you install one, you can rest easy knowing your cat has easy access to water. You can choose one you know your cat will like since they come in so many different models. There are fountains that always have constant flowing clean water while others have a bowl which refills as your pet cat drinks from it.


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